Home > Management & Personal Development, Personal Thoughts... > Lessons Learned from Working in IT

Lessons Learned from Working in IT

In the following article I will try to extract the most notable lessons learned from my experience in the IT field for the past few years.

A quick overview for my dear readers who don’t know my background, I studied Computer Science(CMPS) at the American University of Beirut(AUB) while working at the Computing and Networking Services (CNS) on campus. Following my graduation I worked in IT development at a banking/financial institution while doing some free lance web-development and IT related consultancies.

Overall, I had my share of working on both hardware and software…and the lessons learned all fit in together and I will be pinpointing them as briefly as possible  in the below lines:

  • No problem is too complex. The key to success in this is to decompose the complexity of the issue into smaller manageable parts. Afterwards one only needs to resolve a group of simpler issues that fit in together.
  • Automation is the key to ongoing growth and sustainability of many companies. This is due to the fact that any requested behavior can be mimicked and coded accordingly, with as many exceptions as needed, replacing the need for human interaction with machines.
  • Technology is advancing faster than we expect. The rate at which technology is evolving allows for sophisticated solutions to be designed and implemented with growing speed and ease. What was nearly impossible 10 years ago can be developed in a week today.
  • IT team leaders can make or break the company. One of the keys for successful IT teams is a team leader who knows how to leverage the expertise of the team, provide enough autonomy while still closely overseeing the work.
  • Programming in multiple languages is becoming a must. Knowing one programming language …in our times…is no longer enough to keep with the pace of advancement and to develop the solutions the best fit the needs.
  • GUI is king. Graphical user interface and packaging became as important as the actual functionality of the solutions requested as users demand the simplest and most intuitive tools they can have. People want eye-candy with minimal intellectual effort to use the applications.

In this context, and after checking the above with some of my friends and colleagues, the same lessons apply in most fields and I will definitely be taking those lessons with me in my consultancy and management work from now on.

I hope they help you in one way or another in your career…and I’m open for your comments and suggestions as always. 🙂

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  1. January 8, 2012 at 1:15 am

    The increasing sophistication of processes and never ending pursuit of efficiency necessitate the evolution of new programming languages to keep pace. A business has to adopt IT cycles and mapping in order to get more proficient and eliminate waste. Complexity handling is an art and steadfast endeavor to identify patterns and deal with their mundane repetitive tasks that automation alone can relive the mental stress and free us to innovate and focus on creative solutions.

    • January 8, 2012 at 1:18 am

      Hello Hamzi,

      I totally agree with what you said…couldn’t have said it in any better way. 🙂

      Keep up the great insights!

      Afif

  2. Hady
    January 9, 2012 at 2:18 pm

    great article (y)

  3. January 17, 2012 at 3:21 pm

    Like most IT pros I know, I occasionally have friends or family ask me to get them a job in IT. For some reason, a lot of the people who ask me this have a perception that everyone who works in IT is a millionaire or a billionaire. Aside from having an incorrect perception about IT salaries, few people outside IT seem to understand just how tough working in IT really is. I realize that TechRepublic is frequented by IT pros, so you probably know all too well that there are both advantages and disadvantages to the job.

  4. April 9, 2012 at 10:51 am

    Author you have an amazing blog

  1. January 8, 2012 at 12:41 am
  2. July 18, 2013 at 10:22 am

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